Wednesday, January 25, 2012

3D Shapes

This week, I introduced 3D shapes to my kiddos. We still have a way to go to remember those tricky names, but we're working on it!



Here is the 3D shapes recording page. Anyone have any great ideas for teaching 3D shapes?

16 comments:

  1. Bubbles are a great way to make a sphere and we use toothpicks and marshmallows to make cubes.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Check out this Mr. Harry Kindergarten video called 3D shapes! Your kiddos will love it and catch on right away!

    Jessica
    The Littlest Scholars

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thanks Jessica...we'll have to crowd around the computer tomorrow to watch it! I'm in a portable and the only teacher in the school with no Smartboard :(...maybe they'll let me use the one in the lunchroom :)
    Vickie

    ReplyDelete
  4. Lil' Country Kindergarten posted this 3D Freebie that I love! You can find it here: http://lilcountrykindergarten.blogspot.com/2012/01/3d-shapes-poem-freebie.html Your activities are so cute! =)

    ReplyDelete
  5. WOW! My team mate and I have been looking for some fun ways to work with solids and these are some wonderful ideas! Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Thank you for the great freebie and the awesome photos of 3D shape work! Our math program has the students talk about stacking, sliding and rolling and the worksheet is so confusing. Yours is simple and cute! I am a new follower! Please visit my blog and I will have your worksheet linked on my post this coming week. :)

    http://kindergartenfreckleteacher.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thanks for sharing these fabulous ideas! We will be starting 3D shapes soon, so this is perfect timing. You are wonderful!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Thanks for the sweet comments ladies!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Love your ideas!! So very creative! Not sure what others have recommended or what grade you teach, but I taught 5th graders and loved the lesson I did on 3-D shapes. I don't recall the exact order of it, but we used clay to make shapes. I demonstrated certain shapes and had them reconstruct them. (We had to count the number of faces, bases, and vertices.) I also modeled how to construct a rectangular prism with paper- on which the outline of the shape was drawn. They were able to color it and leave a spot for writing the number of V-Vertices, F-Faces, and B-Bases. (We also discussed different terms for these-sides- faces, bottom- base, pointy corners-vertices). Anyway, they got to design their shapes and then cut them out, tape them up, and count and label the F,B, and V. We tied yarn to them and hung them up in the classroom. I had lots of sheets with a variety of shapes. They were able to individually select the sheet/shape of their choosing- cones, cylinders, pyramids, etc. I even had decahedrons and dodecahedrons for those who wanted the extra challenge. i let them take these home and bring back constructed for extra credit. (allowden@yahoo.com)

    ReplyDelete
  10. ***We also looked around the classroom and tried to identify real world items- kleenex boxes, dice, basketball, etc...
    Sorry to post anonymously. I wasn't sure how to put my name on it. I put an email in case you wanted any other ideas or materials. :)(allowden@yahoo.com)

    ReplyDelete
  11. I have done something similar with my high school ESL students, but we took a trip outside and they constructed shapes out of the snow. Wouldn't work so great this year as we haven't had much snow, but it was a great experience then, most of the students were from countries that were a lot warmer and had never seen snow before so it was a really fun experience. I'm sure most little kids would like the snow no matter if they had seen it before.

    ReplyDelete
  12. You must use the same math program as us (SF)! We are on that chapter now. I am using a poem to help teach:

    3D shapes are fat not flat,
    A cone is like a party hat
    A sphere is like a bouncy ball,
    A prism is like a building tall.
    A cylinder is like a can of pop,
    A cube is like the dice you drop.
    3D shapes are here and there,
    3D shapes are everywhere!

    ReplyDelete
  13. I saw this on pinetrist and decided to check out your blog. Thank you! I'll be using this next year.

    Ashlee
    Sweet Seconds

    ReplyDelete
  14. THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR SHARING YOUR IDEAS! You can use chickpeas and cocktail sticks for making 3D shapes as well. I used the toothpicks and small marshmallows and the shapes were bending and falling down.After I taught the cube, I gave them the two materials and asked them to make a cube. My room was so quiet when they were thinking and using their hands.LOL I love teaching Kindergarten!

    ReplyDelete
  15. what grade your class is amazing

    ReplyDelete